FILE PHOTO: People, some wearing protective face masks, walk over Westminster Bridge, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in London, Britain, July 4, 2021. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls/File Photo

In UK, 9 out of 10 adults would have tested positive for antibodies

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The FINANCIAL — An estimated 945,000 people living in private UK households (1.46% of the population) were experiencing self-reported “long COVID” symptoms as of 4 July 2021.

The number of people with symptoms persisting more than four weeks after their first suspected COVID-19 infection (if not explained by something else) was down slightly from 962,000 (1.49%) at 6 June 2021.

Of those experiencing self-reported “long COVID”, 380,000 (40.2%) first had (or suspected they had) COVID-19 at least a year previously.

As a proportion of the UK population, prevalence of self-reported long COVID was greatest in people aged 35 to 69 years, females, people living in the most deprived areas, those working in health or social care, and those with another activity-limiting health condition or disability.

9 out of 10 adults tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies

Across all four countries of the UK, 9 out of 10 adults would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-Cov-2 in the week beginning 12 July 2021.

There is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) antibodies. In England, an estimated 93.6% of the adult population tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in the week beginning 12 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated. In Wales, the estimated percentage was 93.2%, in Northern Ireland 90.7%, and in Scotland 92.5%. We provide 95% credible intervals in the main bulletin to indicate the uncertainty of each estimate.

The percentage of adults testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies and the percentage of adults who reported being vaccinated in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland continued to increase

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Modelled percentage of adults: who tested positive for antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, who have received one or more doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, and who were fully vaccinated, UK countries, 7 December 2020 to 18 July 2021

The number of deaths from all causes in the UK in the week ending 23 July 2021 was 11,160, 7.8% above the average for the corresponding week in 2015 to 2019.

Deaths were above the five-year average in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Of these, 392 deaths were registered involving coronavirus (COVID-19), accounting for around 1 in 29 deaths (3.5%). This is a 46.3% increase on the previous week.

The number of deaths from COVID-19 increased in all four UK countries compared with the previous week. Deaths include non-residents.

Deaths involving COVID-19 increased in the UK in the week to 23 July

Number of deaths registered by week, UK, week ending 8 January 2021 to week ending 23 July 2021

Using the most up-to-date data, the total number of deaths involving COVID-19 in England and Wales is 141,512 (registrations up to 23 July 2021). Between 13 March 2020 and 23 July 2021, there have been 104,841 excess deaths above the five-year average.

Infections continued to increase in England, Wales and Northern Ireland

Across England, positivity rates increased in the most recent week for those aged two years to school Year 11 and those aged 50 years and over, while the trend is uncertain for all other age groups.

Infections have also continued to increase in most English regions in the latest week, except for the East of England and South West, where the trend is uncertain.

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