Pfizer Announces Outcome of FDA Advisory Committee Meeting for SUTENT

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The FINANCIAL — Pfizer Inc. on September 19 announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee (ODAC) voted 6 in favor and 6 against the benefit-risk profile for SUTENT (sunitinib) as adjuvant treatment of adult patients at high risk of recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after nephrectomy (surgical removal of the cancer-containing kidney).

The role of the Advisory Committee is to provide recommendations to the FDA. The ODAC discussions were based on the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) currently under review by the FDA. The FDA decision on whether or not to approve the sNDA is anticipated by January 2018.

Approximately 75 percent of patients with clear cell RCC are non-metastatic, and 70-80 percent will have a nephrectomy with curative intent, or surgical removal of the tumor.1 High-risk patients represent approximately 15 percent of all patients with primary resected RCC and approximately 60 percent of these high-risk patients will have recurrence and develop metastatic disease within five years. The current treatment is surgery followed by observation. This treatment is suboptimal for patients at high risk of recurrence, according to Pfizer.

“We are encouraged by today’s productive discussion and look forward to working with the FDA over the next few weeks as they incorporate today’s discussion into their review and decision regarding SUTENT in this patient population,” said Mace Rothenberg, MD, Chief Development Officer, Oncology, Pfizer Global Product Development. “SUTENT has long been a standard of care for the treatment of advanced RCC and we believe that this potential benefit can be extended into patients with high-risk of RCC recurrence, as demonstrated in the S-TRAC trial.”

The sNDA under review by the FDA is based on results from the S-TRAC trial, a randomized double-blind Phase 3 trial of adjuvant SUTENT vs. placebo in 615 patients with locoregional, resected RCC at high risk of recurrence. The study met its primary endpoint of improving disease-free survival (DFS), and the results were published by The New England Journal of Medicine in October 2016.

SUTENT was first approved in the United States in 2006 for the treatment of advanced RCC, where it is the most widely prescribed first-line treatment. Now approved in 119 countries,3 more than 350,000 patients have been treated with SUTENT in its approved indications of advanced RCC, imatinib-resistant or -intolerant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET).4 Use of SUTENT is not approved in the adjuvant setting. SUTENT is supported by an extensive body of evidence in scientific literature, including more than 440 publications.

The ODAC is an independent panel of experts that evaluates data concerning the efficacy and safety of marketed and investigational cancer treatments and makes recommendations to the FDA. Its vote is not binding, but is considered by the FDA in its decision making process.

As a leader in the treatment of advanced RCC, Pfizer is dedicated to meeting the unmet needs of these patients and advancing the science of RCC through research into established and novel compounds. Our near term areas of focus include expanding access of our marketed products, exploration of biomarkers to better personalize therapy and immunotherapy combinations.

About SUTENT (sunitinib malate)

SUTENT is an oral multi-kinase inhibitor that works by blocking multiple molecular targets implicated in the growth, proliferation and spread of cancer. Two important SUTENT targets, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) are expressed by many types of solid tumors and are thought to play a crucial role in angiogenesis, the process by which tumors acquire blood vessels, oxygen and nutrients needed for growth. SUTENT also inhibits other targets important to tumor growth, including KIT, FLT3 and RET.

SUTENT Important Safety Information

Boxed Warning/Hepatotoxicity: Hepatotoxicity has been observed in clinical trials and post-marketing experience. This hepatotoxicity may be severe, and deaths have been reported. Monitor liver function tests before initiation of treatment, during each cycle of treatment, and as clinically indicated. SUTENT should be interrupted for Grade 3 or 4 drug-related hepatic adverse events and discontinued if there is no resolution. Do not restart SUTENT if patients subsequently experience severe changes in liver function tests or have other signs and symptoms of liver failure.

Pregnancy: Women of childbearing potential should be advised of the potential hazard to the fetus and to avoid becoming pregnant.

Nursing mothers: Given the potential for serious adverse reactions (ARs) in nursing infants, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or SUTENT.

Cardiovascular events: Cardiovascular events, including heart failure, cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia, and myocardial infarction, some of which were fatal, have been reported. Use SUTENT with caution in patients who are at risk for, or who have a history of, these events. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure (CHF) and, in the presence of clinical manifestations, discontinuation is recommended. Patients who presented with cardiac events, pulmonary embolism, or cerebrovascular events within the previous 12 months were excluded from clinical studies.

QT interval prolongation and Torsades de Pointes: SUTENT has been shown to prolong QT interval in a dose-dependent manner, which may lead to an increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias including Torsades de Pointes, which has been seen in <0.1% of patients. Monitoring with on-treatment electrocardiograms and electrolytes should be considered.

Hypertension: Hypertension may occur. Monitor blood pressure and treat as needed with standard antihypertensive therapy. In cases of severe hypertension, temporary suspension of SUTENT is recommended until hypertension is controlled.

Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS): There have been (<1%) reports, some fatal, of subjects presenting with seizures and radiological evidence of RPLS.

Hemorrhagic events: Hemorrhagic events, including tumor-related hemorrhage such as pulmonary hemorrhage, have occurred. Some of these events were fatal. Perform serial complete blood counts (CBCs) and physical examinations.

Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): Cases of TLS have been reported primarily in patients with high tumor burden. Monitor these patients closely and treat as clinically indicated.

Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA): TMA, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome, sometimes leading to renal failure or a fatal outcome, has been reported in patients who received SUTENT as monotherapy and in combination with bevacizumab. Discontinue SUTENT in patients developing TMA. Reversal of the effects of TMA has been observed after treatment was discontinued.

Proteinuria: Proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome have been reported. Some of these cases have resulted in renal failure and fatal outcomes. Perform baseline and periodic urinalysis during treatment, with follow-up measurement of 24-hour urine protein as clinically indicated. Interrupt SUTENT and dose reduce if 24-hour urine protein is ≥3 g; discontinue SUTENT in cases of nephrotic syndrome or repeat episodes of urine protein ≥3 g despite dose reductions.

Dermatologic toxicities: Severe cutaneous reactions have been reported, including cases of erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), some of which were fatal. If signs or symptoms of EM, SJS, or TEN are present, SUTENT treatment should be discontinued. If a diagnosis of SJS or TEN is suspected, treatment must not be re-started. Necrotizing fasciitis, including fatal cases, has been reported, including of the perineum and secondary to fistula formation. Discontinue SUTENT in patients who develop necrotizing fasciitis.

Thyroid dysfunction: Thyroid dysfunction may occur. Monitor thyroid function in patients with signs and/or symptoms of thyroid dysfunction, including hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and thyroiditis, and treat per standard medical practice.

Hypoglycemia: SUTENT has been associated with symptomatic hypoglycemia, which may result in loss of consciousness or require hospitalization. Reductions in blood glucose levels may be worse in patients with diabetes. Check blood glucose levels regularly during and after discontinuation of SUTENT. Assess whether anti-diabetic drug dosage needs to be adjusted to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia.

Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ): ONJ has been reported. Consider preventive dentistry prior to treatment with SUTENT. If possible, avoid invasive dental procedures, particularly in patients receiving bisphosphonates.

Wound healing: Cases of impaired wound healing have been reported. Temporary interruption of therapy with SUTENT is recommended in patients undergoing major surgical procedures.

Adrenal function: Adrenal hemorrhage was observed in animal studies. Monitor adrenal function in case of stress such as surgery, trauma, or severe infection.

Laboratory tests: CBCs with platelet count and serum chemistries including phosphate should be performed at the beginning of each treatment cycle for patients receiving treatment with SUTENT.

CYP3A4 coadministration: Dose adjustments are recommended when SUTENT is administered with CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers. During treatment with SUTENT, patients should not drink grapefruit juice, eat grapefruit, or take St John’s Wort.

Most common ARs & most common grade 3/4 ARs (advanced RCC): The most common ARs occurring in ≥20% of patients receiving SUTENT for treatment-naïve metastatic RCC (all grades, vs IFNα) were diarrhea (66% vs 21%), fatigue (62% vs 56%), nausea (58% vs 41%), anorexia (48% vs 42%), altered taste (47% vs 15%), mucositis/stomatitis (47% vs 5%), pain in extremity/limb discomfort (40% vs 30%), vomiting (39% vs 17%), bleeding, all sites (37% vs 10%), hypertension (34% vs 4%), dyspepsia (34% vs 4%), arthralgia (30% vs 19%), abdominal pain (30% vs 12%), rash (29% vs 11%), hand-foot syndrome (29% vs 1%), back pain (28% vs 14%), cough (27% vs 14%), asthenia (26% vs 22%), dyspnea (26% vs 20%), skin discoloration/yellow skin (25% vs 0%), peripheral edema (24% vs 5%), headache (23% vs 19%), constipation (23% vs 14%), dry skin (23% vs 7%), fever (22% vs 37%), and hair color changes (20% vs <1%).

The most common grade 3/4 ARs (occurring in ≥5% of patients with RCC receiving SUTENT vs IFNα) were fatigue (15% vs 15%), hypertension (13% vs <1%), asthenia (11% vs 6%), diarrhea (10% vs <1%), hand-foot syndrome (8% vs 0%), dyspnea (6% vs 4%), nausea (6% vs 2%), back pain (5% vs 2%), pain in extremity/limb discomfort (5% vs 2%), vomiting (5% vs 1%), and abdominal pain (5% vs 1%).

Most common grade 3/4 lab abnormalities (advanced RCC): The most common grade 3/4 lab abnormalities (occurring in ≥5% of patients with RCC receiving SUTENT vs IFNα) included lymphocytes (18% vs 26%), lipase (18% vs 8%), neutrophils (17% vs 9%), uric acid (14% vs 8%), platelets (9% vs 1%), hemoglobin (8% vs 5%), sodium decreased (8% vs 4%), leukocytes (8% vs 2%), glucose increased (6% vs 6%), phosphorus (6% vs 6%), and amylase (6% vs 3%).

Most common ARs & most common grade 3/4 ARs (imatinib-resistant or -intolerant GIST): The most common ARs occurring in ≥20% of patients with GIST and more commonly with SUTENT than placebo (all grades, vs placebo) were diarrhea (40% vs 27%), anorexia (33% vs 29%), skin discoloration (30% vs 23%), mucositis/stomatitis (29% vs 18%), asthenia (22% vs 11%), altered taste (21% vs 12%), and constipation (20% vs 14%). The most common grade 3/4 ARs (occurring in ≥4% of patients with GIST receiving SUTENT vs placebo) were asthenia (5% vs 3%), hand-foot syndrome (4% vs 3%), diarrhea (4% vs 0%), and hypertension (4% vs 0%).

Most common grade 3/4 lab abnormalities (imatinib-resistant or -intolerant GIST): The most common grade 3/4 lab abnormalities (occurring in ≥5% of patients with GIST receiving SUTENT vs placebo) included lipase (10% vs 7%), neutrophils (10% vs 0%), amylase (5% vs 3%), and platelets (5% vs 0%).

Most common ARs & most common grade 3/4 ARs (advanced pNET): The most common ARs occurring in ≥20% of patients with advanced pNET and more commonly with SUTENT than placebo (all grades, vs placebo) were diarrhea (59% vs 39%), stomatitis/oral syndromes (48% vs 18%), nausea (45% vs 29%), abdominal pain (39% vs 34%), vomiting (34% vs 31%), asthenia (34% vs 27%), fatigue (33% vs 27%), hair color changes (29% vs 1%), hypertension (27% vs 5%), hand-foot syndrome (23% vs 2%), bleeding events (22% vs 10%), epistaxis (21% vs 5%), and dysgeusia (21% vs 5%). The most commonly reported grade 3/4 ARs (occurring in ≥5% of patients with advanced pNET receiving SUTENT vs placebo) were hypertension (10% vs 1%), hand-foot syndrome (6% vs 0%), stomatitis/oral syndromes (6% vs 0%), abdominal pain (5% vs 10%), fatigue (5% vs 9%), asthenia (5% vs 4%), and diarrhea (5% vs 2%).

Most common grade 3/4 lab abnormalities (advanced pNET): The most common grade 3/4 lab abnormalities (occurring in ≥5% of patients with advanced pNET receiving SUTENT vs placebo) included decreased neutrophils (16% vs 0%), increased glucose (12% vs 18%), increased alkaline phosphatase (10% vs 11%), decreased phosphorus (7% vs 5%), decreased lymphocytes (7% vs 4%), increased creatinine (5% vs 5%), increased lipase (5% vs 4%), increased AST (5% vs 3%), and decreased platelets (5% vs 0%).

 

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