White House Watch: Trump 42%, Clinton 40%, Johnson 7%, Stein 2%

White House Watch: Trump 42%, Clinton 40%, Johnson 7%, Stein 2%

White House Watch: Trump 42%, Clinton 40%, Johnson 7%, Stein 2%

The FINANCIAL -- Are concerns over Hillary Clinton’s health changing the equation? Donald Trump has once again edged ahead of Clinton after trailing her by four points a week ago.

The latest Rasmussen Reports weekly White House Watch national telephone and online survey shows Trump with 42% support to Clinton’s 40%. Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson gets seven percent (7%) of the vote, and Green Party candidate Jill Stein earns two percent (2%). Another two percent (2%) like some other candidate, and seven percent (7%) are undecided. 

Clinton led Trump 43% to 39% a week ago  and has trailed the GOP nominee only one time since mid-July.Still, the race has remained a close one for months, within or just outside our survey’s +/- 3 margin of error.

Clinton earns 74% support among Democratic voters, while 76% of Republicans favor Trump. Trump has pulled slightly ahead of Clinton 36% to 32% among voters not affiliated with either political party.

Johnson has the support of six percent (6%) of Republicans, two percent (2%) of Democrats and 15% of unaffiliateds. Stein earns just one percent (1%) support from GOP voters, two percent (2%) of Democrats and three percent (3%) of unaffiliated voters.

This latest White House Watch survey was taken after Clinton’s fainting spell at Sunday’s 9/11 ceremony in New York City and after her campaign’s release of a statement saying she is suffering from pneumonia. Democrats aren’t worried about Clinton’s health, but most other voters feel she may not be physically up to the job. 

This week's survey finds Trump with a six-point advantage among men and in a near tie among women.

Clinton remains ahead among those under 40 but trails among older voters.

The Democratic nominee is the choice of 73% of liberal voters and holds a 45% to 31% advantage among moderates. Seventy-two percent (72%) of conservatives prefer Trump.

Voters strongly agree that a candidate’s health is an important voting issue, but while most Republicans and unaffiliated voters think the state of Clinton’s health is worth exploring, the majority of Democrats disagree.

Americans continue to question the country’s safety from terrorism and are skeptical of the government’s ability to prevent domestic terror attacks in the future.  Voters tend to think Trump would do a better job than Clinton protecting the country from terrorists.

An overwhelming majority of voters continues to believe politicians don’t keep their campaign promises and are even more convinced it’s because they’ll say whatever it takes to get elected.

The percentage of all voters who consider a candidate’s religious faith important to their vote continues to decline. Voters put even less stock into a candidate’s appearance or racial background.